Everyone has a reason to live

Jacques Lusseyran went blind at age 8. When he was twice as old, in 1941, he founded one of the key organizations of the French Resistance. His memoir, And There Was Light, has been on my wish list for years! (Kathy Brown mentioned it in a Brain Gym course, Vision Circles, and I finally ordered New World Library’s beautiful new edition. Bless you all for bringing me this book.)

I fell in love with this book from the first paragraph: “When you said to me: ‘Tell me the story of your life,’ I was not eager to begin. But when you added, ‘What I care most about is learning your reasons for loving life,’ then I became eager, for that was a real subject.”

I knew I would tell you about this book, and encourage you to write about loving life, especially if you have ever found that difficult. I came to my computer and found two of you offering the same message.

Josie Thompson battles bipolar symptoms to get out of bed, and she has traveled the US and Italy to ask people what gets them out of bed, what brings them joy. Now she is going to the Philippines with the goal of bringing joy through humanitarian service. She says she discovered long ago that she does not have to be healed to help, and she wants everyone to know, “Everyone has a reason to live.”

Josie Thompson, the 444 Project
Josie Thompson, the 444 Project

Exuberant performer Shaun Parry founded Promethean Spark to teach life skills through dance in developing nations, including the leprosy colonies of India. Did you know we could eradicate leprosy in one generation by overcoming the cultural stigma, seeing it as a treatable disease instead of a curse? I was especially touched to see beautiful young dancers from these colonies represent, in one of their dances, their loved ones’ experience with leprosy.

LIFEDANCE performance
LIFEDANCE performance

There’s your assignment. Love your life, write it, film it, dance it. Share your light.

__________________

Gwyn Nichols, WritersResort.com 2015

Work like a kid

Little Girl Rolling Snowman Phase 1 copyright Jen D iStockPhoto #000001319904
Snowman Phase 1 by Jen D

“The great thing about getting older is that you don’t lose all the other ages you’ve been. –  Madeleine L’Engle, author of A Wrinkle in Time.

Remember how hard you worked to build a snowman or a tree fort? Only you didn’t know it was work? May your holidays renew the magic.

______________________

Gwyn Nichols, WritersResort.com

Photo “Little Girl Rolling Snowman Phase 1” © Jen D iStockPhoto #1319904

Love is simple, unless you have a hero complex

Invincible poster ASU premier 2013

Invincible, the musical:

Love is simple, unless you have a hero complex

Composer Drew Nichols is an amazingly creative and artistically prolific person.  (Full disclosure: I brought him into this world and raised him—and he’s one of my best teachers!)

If you’re in Arizona May 31 – June 1, catch the premiere of his first musical. It’s hilarious and touching, and that’s just the inspiring collaboration of the talented cast and crew. Wait until you see the show.

ASU’s Evelyn Smith Music Theatre

May 31, 2013, 7:30 pm

June 1st, 2013, 2 pm

June 1st, 2013 7:30 pm

InvincibleShow.EventBrite

More info is also available here:

ASU Arts Students Take on Invincibility

Twitter

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Write Your Book This Year: Give Me Ten

Are you waiting for your retreat, vacation, sabbatical, or retirement to write your book? Uninterrupted time sounds luxurious, and then it can be overwhelming. Whenever I reserve a day for my own project, I celebrate, then usually flounder and remember Julia Cameron’s metaphor, comparing uninterrupted time to a bolt of antique silk. It can be hard to cut into.

As I thought of that recently, I remembered a PBS show, Sewing with Nancy, featuring “10-20-30 Minutes to Sew.” Nancy showed viewers how to create even a fully tailored jacket in tiny pockets of time. She recommended identifying each step, prepping materials the way a chef preps ingredients, and systematically advancing a project day by day.

Sewing with Nancy 30 Years screenshotAnd get this: Nancy is still on the air. It’s the longest running sewing show ever. Teaching her audience to fit hobbies into busy schedules must be one key to her success, and this approach probably renews her own creative stamina.

For her McCall’s patterns, Nancy says, “I don’t have hours to spend sewing every day. Just a few minutes here or there can quickly add up to a finished project!” Go, Nancy!

Few people would wait for a sabbatical to piece a quilt. You don’t need one to write a book either. So drop everything and give me 10, only 10.

_______________________

Text © Gwyn Nichols 2013. All rights reserved. WritersResort.com

Screenshot of Sewing with Nancy from Wisconsin Public Television

Write Your Book This Year: Got Fear?

Fear of writing, or fear of publishing, can be a healthy thing. It means you care. Daring to tell the truth, wanting to say it well, overcoming your fear of failure and your fear of success–those are wonderful ways to grow. Make a list of your fears. Which ones can you do something about? Which ones melt once you look at them?

Write anyway.

Related Book:

Steven Pressfield, Do the Work

_______________________

Text © Gwyn Nichols 2013. All rights reserved. WritersResort.com

5 Love Lessons to Use In Your Business Videos

Happy Valentine’s! Enjoy this fun advice from Lynn Ruby of Ruby Marketing, from Greater Phoenix SCORE.

5 Love Lessons to Use In Your Business Videos.

Write Your Book This Year: How to Write Right Now

"God Calling" © DarkCloud, iStockPhoto #7909523
“God Calling” © DarkCloud

Are you trying to squeeze your dream into your life, or will you fit your life into your dream?

If you are waiting for magical writing time to appear on the horizon (perhaps after you retire), then you, like me, will discover that mirages cannot be caught. Instead, when we stop where we are, and dig deep, time appears and expands. Here are a few suggestions:

  1. Calendar the upcoming week. Block out the set commitments and routines. Outline the available hours for everything you want to do. Designate some as writing time.
  2. Begin and close each planning and writing session by connecting with divine guidance, in whatever way that works for you. Ask that your writing be of service to others and meet your own needs.
  3. Carry a journal or notebook around. Steal moments, capture ideas.
  4. Keep Morning Pages. Julia Cameron suggests three pages written first thing. It works best half asleep, and scribbling. These don’t count as writing. It’s usually the second half, after I run out of ideas, when ideas begin to flow.
  5. Count the ways you’re already writing. E-mailing, blogging? Copy those notes into one file. Plan ways to share your book in segments.
  6. Next week, we’ll talk about fear. Until then, write anyway.

What helps you fit your dream into your life? Or your life into your dream?

_______________________

Text © Gwyn Nichols 2013. All rights reserved. WritersResort.com

Photo “God Calling” © DarkCloud, iStockPhoto #7909523